Chile

Bask in the charm of South America while exploring the historical Easter Island of Chile and the frosted mountains of the Andes.
Chile is a South American country that holds the record as the longest country in the world from north to south. All the climates of the planet coexist in Chile except tropical weather. Central Chile is the most populous, housing the larger cities and capital, Santiago. The Atacama Desert in the north is ideal for enjoying unparalleled views of the night sky. The south-central region of Chile contains the serene Lake District, which is renowned for its stunning snow-capped volcanoes nestled by forestry. This area is the agricultural hub of Chile because of the humid, temperate weather. Cape Horn, the southernmost point of Chile, offers opportunities to encounter penguins and dolphins. Also, you can learn about the history of the surrounding treacherous waters. Chileans are pleasant people, living in peace with one another despite differences in traditions and culture, languages and religion. Spanish is the most common language spoken in the country and most of the population belongs to the Roman Catholic Church.
Panoramic view of the 15 Moai statues at Ahu Tongariki at sunrise, Easter Island (Rapa Nui), Chile. The backlit statues, against a bright blue sky with white clouds, cast long shadows upon the green grassy field in the foreground.

 

 

 

The Atacama Desert located in North Chile is an amazing place to enjoy the vast desert extensions full of salt lakes, salt flats, sand, beautiful beaches, and an awesome night sky, and when the rain comes millions of flowers blooming making a wonderful landscape

 

Chile is a long, narrow country extending from Central South America to the southernmost tip of the continent. It’s 350 km (217 miles) wide from east to west and about 700 Km (400 miles) north of Antarctica. Peru and Bolivia share Chile’s northern border and Argentina spans the entire eastern boundary. The Pacific Ocean lies in the west and the Drake Passage in the south. Chile has four territories off the coast in the Pacific Ocean. Easter Island, a volcanic landmass with about 900 massive stone figures called Moai; the Juan Fernández archipelago and Isla Sala y Gómez, a small, uninhabited island; and the angler islands of San Félix and San Ambrosio. There are three distinguishable landscapes spanning from east to west: the Andes mountainous region along most of the Eastern Chile-Argentina border, the longitudinal valley in the center, and the coastline along the Pacific Ocean. Most of the highest mountains forming the Chilean Andes mountain range are volcanic, with some extinct and others active. In the Lake District, one can bask in the stunning sights the frosted cone-shaped mountains create on glacial lakes. Mainland Chile is further divided into four geographical zones from the north to the south. The desert region in the north comprises the world’s most arid desert, the Atacama Desert. It consists of parts without recorded rainfall and extremely high solar radiation. The Mediterranean central valley, which is home to Chile’s cities and capital (Santiago) and a thriving agricultural area. Grazing fields, forests and a chain of volcanoes and lakes characterize the south. The region closest to Antarctica is a blend of fjords, glaciers, forests, and mountains.

 

Marble Caves of lake General Carrera (Chile)

 

 

Chile’s climate varies by region, much like its geographical landscape. The country has all kinds of climates on earth except for tropical weather. This is because of the chilly Peru Current, the Pacific Ocean, the Andes Mountains, and the South Pacific anticyclone winds that control the elements. The north has a hot desert climate, and central Chile has a Mediterranean climate. Easter Island experiences a humid, subtropical climate. An oceanic climate dominates the south and east, resulting in cold and humid weather. Temperatures decline as you head south, where it is much cooler than the northern regions and receives the most consistent rainfall in the entire country. While the north may be hot during the day, temperatures drop drastically at night. The average lowest temperature in Santiago is 14 °C (57°F). Summer (October to April) in the Mediterranean central area is pleasant and without rain. Winters (May to September) are cool and humid.

Famous traditional dish of the south of Chile and the Chiloe archipelago – Curanto Kuranto. Different seafood and meat cooked in a pit on the coals under the ground.

 

Chile’s geographical span has contributed much variety to its cuisine. Seafood, including mussels, salmon, sea bass, and scallops, is a staple readily available from the fish markets scattered along the shoreline. The grazing fields in the southern regions of Chile sustain herds of cattle that provide the most delicious grass-fed beef. European settlers introduced this component to Chilean cuisine. The Spanish contributed lemons and onions to the local gastronomy and the Germans, beer, yogurt, and mayonnaise. You won’t be short on meals to try in Chile nor disappointed by the quality of the seafood and produce. Popular local dishes include pastel de choclo (a sweet corn dish containing chicken, beef, black olives, raisins or onions) and empanadas (a turnover stuffed with cheese, beef or shellfish). The most traditional dish dating back centuries is curanto. It comprises seafood, potatoes, meat, and vegetables steamed in a hole over hot stones and covered with leaves. To top off any meal, try out some of Chile’s renowned red wines that rank amongst the best in the world. Must-try desserts include Italian-style ice cream (helado) and others made with dulce de leche (manjar).

Cueca is the traditional dance inside Chilean territory. A dance that is done in pairs, one woman and a man that dance with a scarf wooing the lady

 

 

Traditional Chilean dress comprises a chamanto or poncho for men made from silk or wool and a straw hat (chupalla), and a full-skirted floral dress for women. This attire is worn in rural areas, while modern clothing is more common in cities.

Chile’s defined seasons and climates make it easy to determine what to bring along during a certain time of year. The golden rule is to dress for comfort when traveling in Chile.

Summer in Central Chile dictates light clothing. Shorts are acceptable, granted you may receive unwanted attention. In the coastal regions, warmer garments are best. And to appear less like a tourist, avoid shorts and tank tops.

Wear layers if you’re traveling from one area to another in Chile so you can easily shed clothes as it gets warmer. Opt for light wool fabrics that can contain the heat when it’s cold and wick moisture when it’s warm.

For a winter trip, bring along a coat, long-sleeved shirt, pants, and a rain jacket.

While it’s not essential to dress smartly when visiting restaurants, it will keep you from standing out, especially in Santiago.

Sunscreen, a wide-brimmed hat or a cap, and sunglasses are advised.

Modest attire is necessary when visiting religious and government buildings.

 

Chile money. Paper banknotes of the country from South America

 

The Chilean Peso (CLP) is the official legal tender of Chile. Coins come in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500 pesos, and banknotes in 1,000, 2,000, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 pesos. Many cities in Chile have ATMs. International credit and debit cards can be used for payment at select businesses. Visa and MasterCard are accepted more often than other cards.

Do You Speak Spanish? sign

 

 

Spanish is the official and widely spoken language in Chile. Chilean Spanish is like European Spanish, except it has its own particular flair. The dialect (Castellano de Chile) is unique to Chileans, and it’s spliced with some indigenous languages. Easter Island has a traditional language known as Rapa Nui, although Spanish is common as well. Some locals speak Greek or other foreign languages such as German, in the southern regions, and English, in major cities. Indigenous languages are in the minority of languages spoken in Chile. One or two hundred thousand people of the largest indigenous community, Mapuche, speak Mapudungun. Knowing basic Spanish words and phrases can make navigating Chile much easier. Here are a few terms and sayings to get you started: Good morning – Buenos días Good evening – Buenas tardes Please – Por favor Yes/No – Si/No Thank you very much – Muchas gracias My name is… – Me llamo… How much is it? – Cuánto cuesta? Alright/Okay/That’s fine – Está Bien

La Tirana (Iquique), Chile: Men dressed devils. The Festival of La Tirana is a religious festival of Catholic origin in honor of the Virgin of Carmen which takes place on 16th July every year in the village of La Tirana in the Region of Tarapaca, Chile. It is one of the most important religious celebrations throughout the whole of Chile in which between 100 and 200 thousand pilgrims gather during the week of the celebrations in this small village of no more than 560 inhabitants.

 

The modern Chilean way of life was formed over the country’s long history. Starting from Chile’s early years, the Andean culture dominated the northern regions and the Mapuche culture presided in the south. Over time, following the conquest, Spanish culture invaded Chile’s established traditions. As more immigrants came into the country, English, French, and German traditions contributed to the local culture and they continue to until this day. On Easter Island, 60 percent of the population is native inhabitants (Rapa Nui). The majority of Chileans are Christians, a large portion belonging to the Roman Catholic Church and a smaller share are Protestants. Observers of the Evangelical Church, Jews, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Latter-Day Saints have religious standing in Chile as well. Celebrations in Chile are not only reserved for Chilean Independence Day but also for other occasions. In July, locals celebrate the annual Tirana festival in the town of La Tirana. It features participants dressed in costumes and masks, celebrating a time rooted in both legends and facts. The Tapati Festival held every February on Easter Island invites everyone to discover the culture of the Rapa Nui people. Popular Chilean music ranges from folkloric to classical and the national dance is cueca. Chile’s most famous poet and Noble Prize recipient is Pablo Neruda. His most famous work, One Hundred Love Sonnets, is said to capture the stunning night skies of Chile in vivid detail. The most popular sport in Chile is football. Their team has made nine appearances at the FIFA World Cup championship. Chilean greetings are very warm. Women touch cheeks and kiss the air around while men share hearty hugs.

Chilean Passport

 

British nationals don’t require a visa to enter Chile. Upon arrival, immigrations officials will issue you a Tarjeta de Turismo (Tourist Card). Keep this document safe during your stay, but if you lose it, you can get a copy. Your vacation in Chile is limited to 90 days. For longer stays, consult the Chilean embassy. Unlike other destinations, there’s no minimum validity required for your passport. The only requirement is that it’s valid for the duration of your stay.

This image is a vector illustration.

 

Chile uses Type C (flat with two prongs) and L (flat with three adjacent prongs) plugs and sockets. The standard voltage is 220V and the standard frequency is 50Hz. Be sure to bring along a universal adapter with surge protection and a voltage converter for devices that are 110V.

Introduction
Panoramic view of the 15 Moai statues at Ahu Tongariki at sunrise, Easter Island (Rapa Nui), Chile. The backlit statues, against a bright blue sky with white clouds, cast long shadows upon the green grassy field in the foreground.

 

 

 

Location and Geography
The Atacama Desert located in North Chile is an amazing place to enjoy the vast desert extensions full of salt lakes, salt flats, sand, beautiful beaches, and an awesome night sky, and when the rain comes millions of flowers blooming making a wonderful landscape

 

Chile is a long, narrow country extending from Central South America to the southernmost tip of the continent. It’s 350 km (217 miles) wide from east to west and about 700 Km (400 miles) north of Antarctica. Peru and Bolivia share Chile’s northern border and Argentina spans the entire eastern boundary. The Pacific Ocean lies in the west and the Drake Passage in the south. Chile has four territories off the coast in the Pacific Ocean. Easter Island, a volcanic landmass with about 900 massive stone figures called Moai; the Juan Fernández archipelago and Isla Sala y Gómez, a small, uninhabited island; and the angler islands of San Félix and San Ambrosio. There are three distinguishable landscapes spanning from east to west: the Andes mountainous region along most of the Eastern Chile-Argentina border, the longitudinal valley in the center, and the coastline along the Pacific Ocean. Most of the highest mountains forming the Chilean Andes mountain range are volcanic, with some extinct and others active. In the Lake District, one can bask in the stunning sights the frosted cone-shaped mountains create on glacial lakes. Mainland Chile is further divided into four geographical zones from the north to the south. The desert region in the north comprises the world’s most arid desert, the Atacama Desert. It consists of parts without recorded rainfall and extremely high solar radiation. The Mediterranean central valley, which is home to Chile’s cities and capital (Santiago) and a thriving agricultural area. Grazing fields, forests and a chain of volcanoes and lakes characterize the south. The region closest to Antarctica is a blend of fjords, glaciers, forests, and mountains.

 

Climate and weather
Marble Caves of lake General Carrera (Chile)

 

 

Chile’s climate varies by region, much like its geographical landscape. The country has all kinds of climates on earth except for tropical weather. This is because of the chilly Peru Current, the Pacific Ocean, the Andes Mountains, and the South Pacific anticyclone winds that control the elements. The north has a hot desert climate, and central Chile has a Mediterranean climate. Easter Island experiences a humid, subtropical climate. An oceanic climate dominates the south and east, resulting in cold and humid weather. Temperatures decline as you head south, where it is much cooler than the northern regions and receives the most consistent rainfall in the entire country. While the north may be hot during the day, temperatures drop drastically at night. The average lowest temperature in Santiago is 14 °C (57°F). Summer (October to April) in the Mediterranean central area is pleasant and without rain. Winters (May to September) are cool and humid.

Cuisine
Famous traditional dish of the south of Chile and the Chiloe archipelago – Curanto Kuranto. Different seafood and meat cooked in a pit on the coals under the ground.

 

Chile’s geographical span has contributed much variety to its cuisine. Seafood, including mussels, salmon, sea bass, and scallops, is a staple readily available from the fish markets scattered along the shoreline. The grazing fields in the southern regions of Chile sustain herds of cattle that provide the most delicious grass-fed beef. European settlers introduced this component to Chilean cuisine. The Spanish contributed lemons and onions to the local gastronomy and the Germans, beer, yogurt, and mayonnaise. You won’t be short on meals to try in Chile nor disappointed by the quality of the seafood and produce. Popular local dishes include pastel de choclo (a sweet corn dish containing chicken, beef, black olives, raisins or onions) and empanadas (a turnover stuffed with cheese, beef or shellfish). The most traditional dish dating back centuries is curanto. It comprises seafood, potatoes, meat, and vegetables steamed in a hole over hot stones and covered with leaves. To top off any meal, try out some of Chile’s renowned red wines that rank amongst the best in the world. Must-try desserts include Italian-style ice cream (helado) and others made with dulce de leche (manjar).

Clothing and Dress
Cueca is the traditional dance inside Chilean territory. A dance that is done in pairs, one woman and a man that dance with a scarf wooing the lady

 

 

Traditional Chilean dress comprises a chamanto or poncho for men made from silk or wool and a straw hat (chupalla), and a full-skirted floral dress for women. This attire is worn in rural areas, while modern clothing is more common in cities.

Chile’s defined seasons and climates make it easy to determine what to bring along during a certain time of year. The golden rule is to dress for comfort when traveling in Chile.

Summer in Central Chile dictates light clothing. Shorts are acceptable, granted you may receive unwanted attention. In the coastal regions, warmer garments are best. And to appear less like a tourist, avoid shorts and tank tops.

Wear layers if you’re traveling from one area to another in Chile so you can easily shed clothes as it gets warmer. Opt for light wool fabrics that can contain the heat when it’s cold and wick moisture when it’s warm.

For a winter trip, bring along a coat, long-sleeved shirt, pants, and a rain jacket.

While it’s not essential to dress smartly when visiting restaurants, it will keep you from standing out, especially in Santiago.

Sunscreen, a wide-brimmed hat or a cap, and sunglasses are advised.

Modest attire is necessary when visiting religious and government buildings.

Currency

 

Chile money. Paper banknotes of the country from South America

 

The Chilean Peso (CLP) is the official legal tender of Chile. Coins come in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500 pesos, and banknotes in 1,000, 2,000, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 pesos. Many cities in Chile have ATMs. International credit and debit cards can be used for payment at select businesses. Visa and MasterCard are accepted more often than other cards.

Language
Do You Speak Spanish? sign

 

 

Spanish is the official and widely spoken language in Chile. Chilean Spanish is like European Spanish, except it has its own particular flair. The dialect (Castellano de Chile) is unique to Chileans, and it’s spliced with some indigenous languages. Easter Island has a traditional language known as Rapa Nui, although Spanish is common as well. Some locals speak Greek or other foreign languages such as German, in the southern regions, and English, in major cities. Indigenous languages are in the minority of languages spoken in Chile. One or two hundred thousand people of the largest indigenous community, Mapuche, speak Mapudungun. Knowing basic Spanish words and phrases can make navigating Chile much easier. Here are a few terms and sayings to get you started: Good morning – Buenos días Good evening – Buenas tardes Please – Por favor Yes/No – Si/No Thank you very much – Muchas gracias My name is… – Me llamo… How much is it? – Cuánto cuesta? Alright/Okay/That’s fine – Está Bien

Culture and customs
La Tirana (Iquique), Chile: Men dressed devils. The Festival of La Tirana is a religious festival of Catholic origin in honor of the Virgin of Carmen which takes place on 16th July every year in the village of La Tirana in the Region of Tarapaca, Chile. It is one of the most important religious celebrations throughout the whole of Chile in which between 100 and 200 thousand pilgrims gather during the week of the celebrations in this small village of no more than 560 inhabitants.

 

The modern Chilean way of life was formed over the country’s long history. Starting from Chile’s early years, the Andean culture dominated the northern regions and the Mapuche culture presided in the south. Over time, following the conquest, Spanish culture invaded Chile’s established traditions. As more immigrants came into the country, English, French, and German traditions contributed to the local culture and they continue to until this day. On Easter Island, 60 percent of the population is native inhabitants (Rapa Nui). The majority of Chileans are Christians, a large portion belonging to the Roman Catholic Church and a smaller share are Protestants. Observers of the Evangelical Church, Jews, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Latter-Day Saints have religious standing in Chile as well. Celebrations in Chile are not only reserved for Chilean Independence Day but also for other occasions. In July, locals celebrate the annual Tirana festival in the town of La Tirana. It features participants dressed in costumes and masks, celebrating a time rooted in both legends and facts. The Tapati Festival held every February on Easter Island invites everyone to discover the culture of the Rapa Nui people. Popular Chilean music ranges from folkloric to classical and the national dance is cueca. Chile’s most famous poet and Noble Prize recipient is Pablo Neruda. His most famous work, One Hundred Love Sonnets, is said to capture the stunning night skies of Chile in vivid detail. The most popular sport in Chile is football. Their team has made nine appearances at the FIFA World Cup championship. Chilean greetings are very warm. Women touch cheeks and kiss the air around while men share hearty hugs.

Passport and visa information
Chilean Passport

 

British nationals don’t require a visa to enter Chile. Upon arrival, immigrations officials will issue you a Tarjeta de Turismo (Tourist Card). Keep this document safe during your stay, but if you lose it, you can get a copy. Your vacation in Chile is limited to 90 days. For longer stays, consult the Chilean embassy. Unlike other destinations, there’s no minimum validity required for your passport. The only requirement is that it’s valid for the duration of your stay.

Electricity and plug
This image is a vector illustration.

 

Chile uses Type C (flat with two prongs) and L (flat with three adjacent prongs) plugs and sockets. The standard voltage is 220V and the standard frequency is 50Hz. Be sure to bring along a universal adapter with surge protection and a voltage converter for devices that are 110V.

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